Special Feature: Foo Foo Festival

Festival logo

Do you Foo? There’s nothing quite like Pensacola, Florida in the Fall and if it’s Fall that means it’s time for Foo Foo Fest!

The highly-anticipated arts and culture festival, one of the largest in the South, spans an impressive 12 days and has blossomed into a “don’t miss” event for both tourists and locals alike. Pensacola will host the 6th Annual Foo Foo Festival from October 31 to November 11, 2019. This year’s Foo Foo Fest line up runs the gamut from internationally-acclaimed classical piano virtuoso Garrick Ohlsson, renowned jazz band Big Bad Voodoo Daddy and Multi-Grammy nominated musician Marsha Ambrosius to “Skulptures” (a display of 3D printable skateable concrete structures) and a performance of The Savannah Sipping Society (a new play by The Golden Girls writers). Strategically positioned around and during some of Pensacola’s most popular events, the 12-day Foo Foo Fest straddles some of the area’s longstanding and favorite happenings including the 47th Annual Great Gulf Coast Arts Festival, the Blue Angels Homecoming Air Show, Pensacola Eggfest and the 35th Annual Frank Brown International Songwriters’ Festival.

Stompfest Step Show

Foo Foo Fest is big fun, with events of high artistic and cultural caliber, delivered with a hefty dose of Southern sophistication. Pensacola’s pristine sugar-white beaches and emerald green water entice visitors from all over the world. Upon arrival in the delightful Florida panhandle city, many find themselves equally captivated by its history, culture and diverse heritage. The Foo Foo Festival profiles and celebrates this wide array of culture throughout the city, featuring innovative and extraordinary artists from all genres including art, music, theatre and much more.

In addition to the plethora of arts and cultural happenings during Foo Foo Fest, Pensacola offers year-round historic walking tours, a large farmer’s market, quaint shops, food trucks and brewery tours. Visitors can stroll along the bay, enjoy the beautiful beaches, experience the culinary arts scene, and take in historic sites all staged in the backdrop of relaxed elegance unique to this historic city on the Gulf Coast.

For more information, visit: www.foofoofest.com

A crowd watching a music performance

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Culture in Florida: September 2019

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Culture in Florida is a monthly news roundup to showcase our state’s wonderful diversity, spotlight the organizations and artists that contribute so much to our communities, and stress the comprehensive benefits of arts and culture to Florida’s economy and quality of life.

September was as busy a month as ever! Arts and cultural organizations across the state celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month, a diverse group of festivals were held, and many interesting art exhibits opened to the public.

Here’s a sample of arts and culture around the state for the month of September:


FEATURED FESTIVAL

Hemming Park in Jacksonville, Florida hosted their second annual Hispanic Heritage Celebration with an evening of music, dance, food, and fun for all families presented by VyStar Credit Union. Performances included Orchestra Fuego, CaribeGroove, and Danzas Perujax.


SPECIAL EVENTS

The Young at Art Museum (YAA) is celebrating their 30th anniversary. As part of their celebrations, the YAA offered 2 for 1 admission throughout the month. September is also Broward Arts and Attractions Month which encourages museum visitors to experience the diversity of cultures throughout 17 museums in Broward County.

The United Arts of Central Florida, UF Center for Arts in Medicine, ArtPlace America, and the Division of Cultural Affairs presented the Creating Healthy Communities: Arts + Public Health Florida Conference on September 23-24 hosted by Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts and The Pabst Steinmetz Foundation. Over 250 attendees of art professionals, public health professionals, educators, researchers and government officials, from around the nation, gathered to connect at the intersections of the arts, public health, and community development.


OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS

The Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra (TSO) began their concert season this month with French Impressions featuring music by French composers including Maurice Ravel and Claude Debussy. Conrad Tao was the featured pianist for the TSO’s first concert.

The Museum of Florida History hosted the 37th Annual Capital City Quilt Show Autumn Reverie on September 27th. This exhibit will be on display until November 3, in partnership with the Quilters Unlimited of Tallahassee. Quilters will be there to answer questions and give information about quilting. A scavenger hunt, interactive stitch boards, and magnetic quilt table are also available for young visitors.

Each year, the exhibit highlights the Opportunity Quilt, designed by members of the guild. This year’s quilt features Autumn Reverie. The quilt design is from the Lakeshore Hosta quilt pattern by Judy and Brad Niemeyer. Visitors have a chance to win the Opportunity Quilt be making a contribution to Quilters Unlimited.

2019 Opportunity Quilt, Autumn Reverie

UPCOMING IN OCTOBER

The Spanish Lyric Theatre is presenting an off-Broadway hit filled with your favorite songs from the 50’s and 60’s, The Marvelous Wonderettes.

Join the Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden for their 2019 Lantern Festival on Saturday, October 19 from 3 to 8 pm. General admission ticket sales start at 10 am on October 7.

A SMALL THANK YOU

Here at the Division of Cultural Affairs, we finished all the grant panel meetings. A big thank you to every panelist and arts representative who participated in the meetings. We appreciate your time and hard work!


Subscribe to this blog or follow us on Twitter for more updates!

Have an event you’d like to see featured as part of this blog series? Please fill out this form: https://goo.gl/forms/rNFpweK1euL3y9YH2Note: submission does not guarantee inclusion. 

Grantee Feature: Bay Arts Alliance Reflects Upon Post-Hurricane Michael

About the Bay Arts Alliance

Founded in 1978 and located in Panama City Center for the Arts, Bay Arts Alliance has served as the local arts agency for Bay County. Their mission is to inspire a lifelong appreciation for the arts. They provide opportunities for cultural enrichment through exhibitions, educational experiences, and quality performances.


On October 10, 2018, Bay County was hit with a Category 5 hurricane named Michael. As the year anniversary of the storm approaches, Bay Arts Alliance, Bay County’s Local Arts Agency, reflects on recovery and expresses hope for the future. We asked the new Executive Director, Jayson Kretzer about his thoughts about the current state of the Arts in Bay County.

Marina Civic Center before Hurricane Michael

“When Michael hit, we were shell shocked…we’re probably still shocked. Nothing can prepare you for the devastation of a storm that strong.

Our community lost over 90% of our trees, tens of thousands of jobs, and 100% of our buildings were either damaged, or simply destroyed.

The arts were just as devastated.

Out of all the arts buildings, theaters, and galleries in the county, only a few remain.

We lost one of the venues we’ve managed for decades, the Marina Civic Center —the largest performing arts venue in Bay County—but the other, the Panama City Center for the Arts, reopened a few days after the storm, and we’ve been able to provide much needed arts programming to the community as we recover.

Damages inside and outside the center
Wreckage of the Marina Civic Center sign

As the anniversary approaches and we take stock of the arts community, we can honestly say that things are improving. Arts groups have combined forces in the galleries and arts buildings that remain open. Performance groups have adapted to smaller, alternate venues, once again able to host music and theatre performances. And artists are slowly finding inspiration again despite the upheaval of homes and businesses.

As our galleries and theatres reopen over the next few years, we are hopeful for the future.

We aren’t going to pretend that the road ahead will be easy. As with most communities there are many obstacles in the way—chief among them will be gaining city and public support to keep the arts at the forefront of rebuilding efforts.

We all know that the arts are powerhouse economic drivers, but now it’s our job to remind our local and county officials of that fact as they make plans for the future.

Arts are essential to the health of a community. Right now Bay County is suffering, but we are going to continue to do everything we can to ensure our city, our arts organizations, and our artists have the resources they need to survive and thrive.”

For more information, please visit the Bay Arts Alliance website: https://www.bayarts.org


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Meet the Florida Council on Arts and Culture: Rivers H. Buford, III

The Florida Council on Arts and Culture is the 15-member advisory council appointed to advise the Secretary of State regarding cultural grant funding and on matters pertaining to culture in Florida.

Appointments to the Council are determined by the Governor, President of the Senate and Speaker of the House, in consultation with the Secretary of State. The Governor manages seven seats that serve four-year terms. The President and Speaker manage four seats each, with terms of two years. The appointments are based on geographic representation, as well as demonstrated history of community service in the arts and culture.

In this bi-monthly series, we will introduce you to each member of the council and share their thoughts on the role of arts and culture in the state of Florida. This month, we chatted with Rivers Buford. Rivers was appointed to the council in 2019 by Governor DeSantis. 

Division of Cultural Affairs (DCA): Tells us a little bit about yourself.

Rivers: As a Government Relations practitioner, I have represented a variety of groups before the state and national government for the past 30 years. I help those who don’t understand public policy or have time to engage in the legislative process. I served under eight different Secretaries’ of State and as a policy advisor to a Senate President.

When I’m not working, I enjoy walking around the woods of my family’s mountain cabin in Clayton, Georgia. I am entering my 35th year of marriage. My wife and I have one daughter, Kathryn Elizabeth. In addition, I have one loyal four-legged family member, Scout, named after Jean Louise in To Kill a Mockingbird.

DCA: Why are the arts and culture important to our state?

Rivers: When I first joined the DOS staff as a team member, the Honorable Katherine Harris was Secretary of State. She sat down with me and explained the value of the arts in cultural relationships, interpersonal relationships and professional business relationships. People want friends with common interests. Art and it’s many disciplines is the universal language that everyone can appreciate, no matter what language they speak or where they live. That is why she felt (and rightfully so) a cultural mission should precede an economic trade mission, to serve as the ice breaker in finding common ground with our future trading partners. The Arts are an economic engine for our state. More people attend events of the arts than sporting events. 

DCA: For you, what is the most inspiring part about working in the arts?

Rivers: I appreciate art in its many disciplines. though I can’t play a single instrument or sing anywhere other than my shower, or paint anything other than a solid wall, I admire those who do, and how they think. It is a gift that I hope to be able to help share with others, so they can learn to appreciate them also.

DCA: What do you hope to accomplish as a member of the Florida Council on Arts and Culture?  

Rivers: I’m an avid (some say rabid) collector of the The Highwaymen Art movement. I hope to be able to light the fire in the minds of other to appreciate our many different disciplines through visits to galleries and museums of all types around our great state. And then hopefully, they will buy something. I once heard, living artist need you to buy now, so they can continue to produce. Dead artists, though their works are great, no matter what the discipline, don’t need the money and are not contributing to our economy.

Culture in Florida: August 2019

Culture in Florida is a monthly news roundup to showcase our state’s wonderful diversity, spotlight the organizations and artists that contribute so much to our communities, and stress the comprehensive benefits of arts and culture to Florida’s economy and quality of life.

Here’s a sample of arts and culture around the state for the month of August:


FEATURED FESTIVAL

Studio 620 in St. Petersburg hosted its inaugural Zine Fest on Sunday, August 25th. A zine (short for magazine or fanzine) is a small-circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images. Creatives from across the Tampa Bay area had zines and other works available for sale and sometimes even to trade, and there was a DIY Zine Zone to craft your own creations.


SPECIAL EVENTS

The 7th annual UPAG Artists Show was held on August 23rd at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa. From the Museum: “The United Photographic Artists Gallery is composed of fully engaged artists versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. UPAG supports the education, income, and creative progress of emerging artists.The 7th annual UPAG Artists Show was held on August 23rd at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in Tampa.”

The Dunedin Fine Arts Center hosted its “wearable ART 15” fashion show on August 24th, featuring presentations by Jenna Barnes, Mark Byrne, Melissa Dolce, the Garden Fairies + Electric Diva, Johnny Hunt, Kikimora Studios, Cindy Linville, and Frank Strunk III. Visit their website to see images from the event.

On Saturday, August 3rd, the Heartland Cultural Alliance held a Cellphone Photo Contest at the HCA Museum Gallery. Cellphone owners countywide submitted photographs from their phone, and community members were then asked to choose the winner from an exhibit of 26 qualifying photographs.


OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS

Opera Atelier in Miami closed its production of “The Not So Little Prince,” a whimsical one-act opera based on the story of The Little Prince which takes audience members on a journey through space and time, on August 18th. The production featured young performers from The Opera Atelier 2019 MOZ-Art Program, alongside their teachers. 

This month in Panama City, The Light Room opened an exhibit called “After the Hurricane: Photos by The Panama City News Herald,” showing coverage of Hurricane Michael recovery with images by Patti Blake and Joshua Boucher. Metal prints of the night sky show sparkling stars over areas impacted by Hurricane Michael, celebrating the courage of Bay County residents and their love for the community.


UPCOMING IN SEPTEMBER

ArtsLaunch2019 will happen on September 7th at the Adrienne Arsht Center. ArtsLaunch is the biggest free community event in Miami that celebrates the performing arts and other arts disciplines, and serves as the annual kick-off to Miami’s art season! The schedule for the celebration includes over 50 activities including free mini performances, interactive workshops, kids’ activities, farmers market, tours, and more.

The Sarasota Orchestra will kick off their “Discover Beethoven” series with performances of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony on September 28th & 29th. This series invites audience members to further explore the composer’s best-loved and most-celebrated works, and it will run through May of 2020.

Celebrate the end of summer with the Cummer Museum in Jacksonville at the last of their “Summer Fridays” series on September 6th. Visitors will enjoy free entertainment, including live music, art activities, lawn games, lounge areas, and more at the Museum’s s riverfront gardens and galleries, with extended hours to 9 PM. Museum-goers will also have their last chance see the French Moderns: Monet to Matisse, 1850–1950 exhibit, which will close on September 8th.

Make sure to check in with your local arts council this month as performing arts organizations begin their new seasons across the state!


Have an event you’d like to see featured as part of this blog series? Please fill out this form: https://goo.gl/forms/rNFpweK1euL3y9YH2Note: submission does not guarantee inclusion. 

Art Talk: Jonathan Brooks, Photographer and Visual Artist

Jonathan Brooks is an award-winning photographer/visual artist, who was born and raised in Miami, Florida. Brooks graduated magna cum laude with a BS degree, double majoring in Advertising and Fine Art Photography with a minor in Marketing from the University of Miami. His studies in graphic design and architecture, and extensive backgrounds in the fashion industry and music industry have also helped to influence his work. He attended one of the Division of Cultural Affairs’ workshops given as part of the Professional Development for Artists program, presented by Citizens for Florida Arts, Inc. in partnership with the Creative Capital Foundation.

Brooks worked for Eastman Kodak during their transition from analog to digital. His photographs have been published in numerous anthologies and periodicals. His Fine Art Photographs have been featured in major movies (Mike & Dave Need Wedding Dates, and Uncle Drew), the Emmy nominated short film series celebrating the 50th anniversary of National Endowment For The Arts- United States Of Art, and television shows (David Makes Man, Southern Charm, The Vampire Diaries, and Germany’s Only Love Counts).

His work has been exhibited in Miami, New York City, Amsterdam, France, Germany, Greece, and the United Kingdom. This includes Art Basel, the Louvre, and the biggest billboard in Times Square.


Division of Cultural Affairs (DCA): Tell us a little about you and your history. What are you currently working on?

Silver Palm Trees by Jonathan Brooks

Jonathan: I’ve always been artistic and it shows in all I do. I was very much into performing arts in grade school through high school, and totally involved in drama and chorus. I grew up with Twilight Zone and Creature Feature, movie stars and rock idols, the photographs of Time, Life and Vogue magazines, LP records and mixed tapes, and MTV videos. I was always a doodler, until taking two and half years of Architecture at community college, in which I found its rigors ruined drawing for me. I later changed my major to advertising and fine art photography at the University of Miami, where I graduated Magna Cum Laude.

I started out entirely into portraiture and was obsessed with the work of my photography idol Herb Ritts. I continued to enjoy shooting fashion and portraits, but it seemed my photography was slowly becoming a hobby due to circumstances beyond my control.  In 2013, after deeply feeling the effects of the recession, and assisting with my father’s five-year long battle with cancer, his death found me refocusing my efforts on my art photography. I found death, mortality, and our journey as my main topics of interest. I suddenly began using skulls in my portraiture and images. 

Winning Photo Of The Year 2014 during Miami’s prestigious art week at the inaugural Miami Photo Salon, and having my skull series used as the work of a photographer character on the CW Network’s hit series The Vampire Diaries, really helped to boost my confidence and encouraged me to continue to pursue my art.

Blue Coconuts by Jonathan Brooks

As of late, I have found a new interest and appreciation for simple still life photography, in contrast to today’s trend of issue based photography (ie. Feminism, climate change,…). I believe the focus on the mastery of photography becomes more important than the underlying reasons behind the photographs. Today, everyone is a photographer and has access to a camera via their cell phone. The rules and techniques of great photography is what ultimately sets the average ones apart from the great ones.

I’m currently working on finding the right place to exhibit my Blue Palms series. I’ve been surrounded by palms for over half a century, and like the great Cuban poet and national hero Jose Marti, I find them inspirational symbols of my birth place and ancestry. It is important to me to find the right venue for this work because I believe it deserves and commands it.

I’m continuing to enjoy botanicals and still life, and want to focus on my ongoing interest in the Everglades, but I am missing my days of portraiture. While enjoying some recent work involving live humans, I’ve begun to play around with masks as identities on individuals, and want to begin a series I have been wanting to start for a while regarding our use of old vs new technology. 

DCA: Why did you choose a career in the arts?

Jonathan: It is innate in me and I really feel that because of that it chose me. I’ve found that my artistic abilities influence everything I do. Whether it be the renovation of my condo in 2000 that was featured in a national publication or in the contents of my Kickstarter funded book The True Cuba that I self-published in 2014. Aside from my photography work, I’ve always gravitated towards all things artistic. In every kind of work I do or have done, I find that there is some level of artistic prowess involved.

A Bubble Bath & A Glass of Wine by Jonathan Brooks

I firmly believe that a true artist expresses themselves in all that they do. Because of that, I would say a career in the arts is much more of a calling, rather than a choice. I know there is a bit of “the artist” in all of us, but I think a few take it to another level, and even fewer take it to another place all together. 

DCA: What is the best part about your job?

Jonathan: The best part about being a photographer is that I am able to find beauty in all that surrounds me and share it with others. It is a great outlet for my creativity and my preferred way of creating art. Every image captured is documenting history, freezing time, and capturing a memory. Finding beauty in the day to day and sharing your vision with the world is an amazing way to connect with others. Showing others how to look at things from a different direction or angle, or helping them see the beauty in themselves is a powerful and rewarding tool.

I’ve always loved the adage “a picture is worth a thousand words.”  I believe photography is probably the strongest means of communication there is and a universal language that anyone can understand.  As children, we learned through picture books before we learned to read. The power of an image to deliver a message is something that is worldwide and transcends limits and boundaries. 

Another great thing about being a photographer is that you can apply your skills to an array of different subject matter.  You are never bored or need to deal with the pains of monotony. One day you can aim your camera at fashion and portraits, another at nature or architecture, and another at street or documentary. As a photographer, the world is your oyster.

DCA: In your opinion, what is the greatest contribution that you and your art have made to your community?

Jonathan: In my opinion, exhibiting, displaying, and selling my art has a great effect on one’s community, and enriches the lives of all of us. It helps economic development and increases business, improves social well-being, and it brings people together to help celebrate the community. It also encourages interaction in public spaces, engagement in community activity, promotes diversity of culture, builds personal and professional relationships, and educates and entertains. The impact is felt not just in museums or galleries, but all around us.

2 Pink Flamingos & A Thunderbird by Jonathan Brooks as exhibition promotional poster in Athens, Greece. Photo courtesy of Blank Wall Gallery

I think my greatest contribution to my community has been garnering attention and recognition for my art outside of my community. Whether it be other cities and states in the nation or other countries paying attention to my work, this contributes to the positive image of our community when it comes to tourists and foreigners. I take great pride in having my work displayed at the Louvre in France, Amsterdam, Germany, Greece, the United Kingdom, and New York City’s Time Square. I also believe having my art used in major movies and television shows adds a credibility to my work and makes it a part of pop culture.

I feel that probably my greatest contribution to my community is having my work in the Emmy nominated short film series United States of Art, celebrating the 50th anniversary of National Endowment For The Arts.  Inclusion in such a historical, meaningful, and recognized piece of work truly makes me proud for being able to represent my community, Miami, and Florida in such a manner.

DCA: What do you think of when you hear “Culture Builds Florida”? Why are the arts and culture important to our state?

No Vacancy by Jonathan Brooks in Shep Rose’s bedroom on Bravo’s Southern Charm. Photo courtesy of Margaret Wright for Parachute Home

Jonathan: I hear that a state without culture would be pretty boring and uninviting. I think Florida is lucky to be extremely rich in art and culture, and because of this many are drawn here. The abundance of art and culture available in Florida through our many and diverse communities has always established Florida among the most cultural places to be. Some of the hottest destinations for tourists from all over the world are in Florida. Orlando, Miami, and the Florida Keys are prime examples of the excellence in art and culture that the state offers. 

Florida locations are also widely used and sought after in television and movies because of our art and culture. From the vintage Flipper series to Miami Vice to the Golden Girls. I am extremely proud to be one of the Florida artists who will have their work featured in the upcoming Oprah Network’s original drama series David Makes Man. The coming-of-age story from Oscar-winning Moonlight co-writer Tarell Alvin McCraney and starring The Cosby Show’s Phylicia Rashad is set in the Florida projects.


The Division thanks Jonathan Brooks for his participation in this interview. To learn more about him and his work, visit his website: http://www.jonathanbrooks.net

Interested in being featured on Culture Builds Florida? Please fill out this form: https://goo.gl/forms/3sMwuJWA3bM1orPl2 (Note: submission does not guarantee inclusion.)

Culture in Florida: July 2019

Culture in Florida is a monthly news roundup to showcase our state’s wonderful diversity, spotlight the organizations and artists that contribute so much to our communities, and stress the comprehensive benefits of arts and culture to Florida’s economy and quality of life.

Here’s a sample of arts and culture around the state for the month of July:


SPECIAL EVENTS

On Saturday, July 13th, the Matheson History Museum teamed up with the Gainesville Sun and Piedmont Publishing for a unique partnership called the “Gainesville Memories Community Project.” This project utilizes images from the Matheson’s collection to create a book focused on the city’s history prior to 1940, tentatively entitled “Gainesville Memories: The Early Years.” Community members were invited to bring in their historic photos dating back to 1940 or earlier.

The Pensacola Orchestra performed a free concert in the Happiness Is exhibition at the Artel Gallery on July 25th. The musicians, a string quartet with oboe, performed works by Mozart, Elgar, and others.

Florida Secretary of State, Laurel M. Lee, visited Tampa and St. Petersburg on July 18th and 19th. While in Tampa, she toured the Straz Center and met with a group of young actors from the cast of Annie with the Patel Conservatory. In St. Petersburg, she alongside Senator Darryl Rouson met with staff from the Morean Arts Center to discuss their community engagement programs, and ended the day by exploring the spectacular Chihuly Collection with her family. Photographs below are from her Twitter page.


OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS

The Ringling Museum in partnership with the Circus Arts Conservatory opened their Summer Circus Spectacular this month, which will run through August 3rd. This hour-long show, housed in the Historic Asolo Theatre, showcases breath-taking circus acts such as the Rolla Bolla, Hand Balancing, Aerial Lyra, Hula Hoop and Interactive Comedy. This summer special is perfect for the entire family!

The 31st Annual Arts in Gadsden exhibition opened at the Gadsden Arts Center & Museum in Quincy on July 25th, and will run through August 6th. This celebration of the region’s creative work presents 101 works by 82 artists. Exhibited works span the mediums of watercolor, egg tempera, acrylic, oil, photography, clay, encaustic, wood, metal, glass, papier maché, and serigraph.

The Venice Theatre opened their performance of Urinetown on July 26th, and it will run until August 11th. The production is described as “a side splitting sendup of greed, love, revolution (and musicals!), in a time when water is worth its weight in gold.”


APOLLO 11 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS

July 20th, 2019 marked the 50th anniversary of the first Moon Landing by spaceflight Apollo 11. Several arts organizations around the state took an opportunity to celebrate this event with special programming outside of their regular season!

The Gulf Coast Symphony celebrated the event with a concert of “moon music” and footage from the historic flight. The program included iconic fare such as Strauss’ “Also Sprach Zarathustra” made famous by the film “2001: A Space Odyssey,” themes from the popular TV show “Star Trek,” and two segments from Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.”

On July 31st and August 1st, the Melbourne Municipal Band will celebrate the moon landing anniversary with a picnic concert featuring various jazz hits.


UPCOMING IN AUGUST

On Thursday, August 15th, the Naples Players will present “Laugh for a Change!” in collaboration with the United Arts Council of Collier County. This fun-filled night of improvisational comedy will allow the Southwest Florida to unite for a great cause: to help provide access to the arts for at-risk children in their community. There will be two separate performances, at 6:00 PM and 8:30 PM.

In collaboration with the Museum of Discovery and Science in Ft. Lauderdale, the South Florida Symphony will present their “Preserve the Coral Reef” concert on August 4th. The performance will feature their music educator, Donna Wissinger, and admission is free with the purchase of a museum ticket.


Have an event you’d like to see featured as part of this blog series? Please fill out this form: https://goo.gl/forms/rNFpweK1euL3y9YH2Note: submission does not guarantee inclusion.